Continuing Education

PROGRAMS

Date/Time Event
12/14/2019
9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Lynne Layton - Intersectionality, unconscious processes, and racial enactments
Macht Auditorium, Cambridge MA
01/21/2020
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
A conversation with Gregory Jules, a social worker at the Justice Resource Institute, Jamaica Plain, MA and a leader in the Haitian community.
03/28/2020
9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Michelle Stevens
Macht Auditorium at Cambridge Hospital, Cambridge MA
04/04/2020
9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Mitchell Wilson
Macht Auditorium at Cambridge Hospital, Cambridge MA

WINTER COURSES

Registration will open in November

SELECTED TOPICS IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOTHERAPY  Elizabeth Slater, PhD

This course will review selected topics in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. It will look at the nature and uses of play and how to use its symbolic and non-symbolic functions. Further it will compare techniques for working with adolescents vs. adults, focusing on both the greater freedom and challenges entailed, especially with reference to managing the upsurge of adolescent urges and impulses. Finally, the class will discuss how to engage parents and how to create a therapeutic environment which supports them while promoting their growth, appreciating the family system as an ally and/or resistance. Ample case material will be used to illustrate these issues.

3 Saturdays: January 11, 25 & February 1, 2020

10:00 — 12 noon

32 Greenridge Lane, Lincoln

Enrollment limit: 7 participants

Click here to learn more: SELECTED TOPICS IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOTHERAPY

Click here to register

CLINICAL USES OF EMPATHY  Cynthia Sortwell, MD and Anna Stothart, Psy.D., LMHC

In this seminar, we will explore the clinical use of empathy. We will begin with a historical review of empathy, examining the ways it has evolved over time. We will then concentrate on Kohut and Self Psychology’s description of empathy as an experience near stance and understand how this stance is essential in the remobilization of the developmental process. We will also think about current views of empathy, how we understand its use in our own clinical practice and what might get in the way of using empathy. The overarching theme will be to explore the clinical use of empathy both through readings and by drawing upon clinical examples from seminar participants to illustrate the various forms empathy may take.

3 Fridays: January 17, 24, & 31, 2020

10:00-12:00PM

The office of Anna Stothart: 240 Concord Avenue, Cambridge

617-216-0778

Enrollment limit: 7 participants

Click here to learn more: CLINICAL USES OF EMPATHY

Click here to register

THE CLINICAL APPLICATION OF CONTEMPORARY SELF PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY  Richard Geist, Ed. D.

This seminar will discuss major clinical concepts from Self Psychology and, through the use of verbatim clinical dialogue, study their implications for conducting psychotherapy. Emphasizing patient centered rather than theory centered treatment, we will focus on implementing an empathic listening stance, responding to resistance and rage, the use of selfobject transferences, how we work with boundaries, understanding frustrations and gratifications, and study the meaning and importance of interpretation.  Throughout this clinically oriented seminar we will emphasize the impact of the therapist on the treatment process.

3 Saturdays: January 25 & February 1, 8, 2020

9:30 to 12:30PM

1905 Beacon Street, Waban, MA

Enrollment limit: 8 participants

Click here to learn more: THE CLINICAL APPLICATION OF CONTEMPORARY SELF PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY

Click here to register

AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL FAMILY SYSTEMS THERAPY  Larry Rosenberg, Ph.D.

Internal Family Systems therapy (IFS), an insight-oriented therapy developed by Richard Schwartz, Ph.D., has gained international and local respect as an innovative and powerful method for understanding conflict, trauma, and defenses and for promoting healing, change, self-empowerment, and self-compassion for individuals, couples, and groups.  IFS draws on systemic, psychodynamic, humanistic, and Buddhist perspectives.  The model assumes that everyone has multiple parts or subpersonalities that constitute an organized internal system, with parts having understandable roles and relationships with one another, like a family.   Our parts took on extreme protective roles or jobs (like defenses) at about the time when early developmental injuries and traumas occurred.   These protective roles include pre-emptive managing (planning, organizing, figuring out, pleasing), critical judging (blaming, shaming), panicking, reactively acting out by a variety of impulsive and compulsive behaviors, dissociating, and somatizing.   Even though the effects of these protective strategies can cause distress to other parts inside and/or to people in our interpersonal lives, the IFS perspective is that parts, in their way, are trying to help.  All parts are welcome!

Saturday, January 11, 2020

9:00 to 4:00PM (with an hour lunch break)

Learning Center A/B, Cambridge Hospital; 1493 Cambridge St., Cambridge

Click here to learn more: AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL FAMILY SYSTEMS THERAPY

Register now

INTRODUCTION TO BALINT GROUP METHOD  David B. Doolittle, Psy.D.

I have been co-leading a Balint Group for Fellows in Palliative Care at Mass General Hospital as part of their Professional Development Group for several years. I am taking a break from that currently and decided to do a Balint Group Leader intensive which was held at Babson College last October. I learned a lot about the value of what my co-leader and I had done and also learned more on how the Balint Group method can be of help in situations of health care dilemmas, conflicts and futility.   The method as taught by the American Balint Group Society is entirely case based and utilizes a structured approach to present, clarify and then imaginatively speculate about the case and the individuals involved. Stuck perspectives are opened up as the members of the group empathically imagine themselves in the positions (shoes) of the clinician, patient, family members, and the relationships between these individuals. The presenter pushes back from the group for most of this discussion freeing the group and the presenter to reflect deeply on the individuals and process of the case presented. A unique feature of this method is that there is no conclusion or summing up of the case at the end. The presenter and group members are left free to integrate aspects of the case as they will individually. In that sense, the group ends as an analytic session ends. The foundations of the method are safety, respect and confidentiality for the presenter and the group members.

There will be no assigned reading in this course.

6 Fridays: January 10, 17, 24, 31 & Feb. 7, 14, 2020

1:00 — 2:15PM

20 Lincoln Street, Watertown

Enrollment limit: 9 participants

Click here to learn more: INTRODUCTION TO BALINT GROUP METHOD

Click here to register

 

MIP STUDY-DIALOGUE GROUP ON WHITENESS

Jody Leader

Linda Luz-Alterman

Most of us live in communities and work in or with institutions that are part of larger unseen systems of structural systemic oppression that contribute to racial inequity.  In this course we will examine materials that demonstrate how ideas of manifest destiny and white supremacy were foundational in the establishment of the United States and its institutions and practices.  We will focus on Whiteness as a system that divides people into categories and look at our own engagement in the culture of white supremacy, white dominance, white normativity, and white fragility. We will explore the impact of these on our clinical work, consulting work, and teaching.

Part educative, part experiential, this study-dialogue group aims to meet each participant where they are in their awareness of these issues and encourage them to learn from the readings and each other. We will offer articles and videos for reflection and dialogue and also invite participants to question their own role in perpetuating white dominance.

Dates and Times: 6 Tuesday evenings, every two weeks, beginning January 7, 2020: 1/7, 1/21, 2/11, 3/10, 3/24, and 4/14.  Snow date if needed – April 28.  We will gather at 7pm for hearty appetizers and fellowship for those who are able to come early.  The group starts promptly at 7:30 PM and ends at 9 PM.

Location: A private home in Brookline, 7 blocks from Brookline Village.

Enrollment Limit: 12 participants

Click here to register

UNDERSTANDING WINNICOTT

This seminar explores a number of Winnicott’s less well known and appreciated papers in order to acquaint participants with psychoanalytic insights that they in particular provide, as well as to further an understanding, not available through his iconic writings alone, of the overall character and structure of his theory. We will examine myriad novel Winnicottian understandings that these less familiar writings advance. His more overarching conception that these papers bring into focus is to the effect that one’s infant-mother interpersonal experience crucially influences the “tone” and “shape” of her/his personal experience throughout life, lays the groundwork for a healthy emotional state of being or some form of psychopathology, and, based on recognition of this personal infant experiential heritage, entails principles for effective psychotherapeutic/analytic interventions at any of diverse points in the life cycle.

Classes: Where and When:

21 Hammond Road, Belmont (ample parking is available on the street)

Sessions for the seminar (one and a half hours in length) will be from 12:30-2:00 on the following Friday afternoons:

Jan. 3,10,17, 24, 31 and Feb.7

Enrollment Limit of 8 participants

Click here to register

SPRING COURSES

PLAY AND CURE: THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF CHILDREN’S PLAY– AN INTERPERSONAL PERSPECTIVE ON CLINICAL TECHNIQUE    Stephen Schlein, Ph.D.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS
MIP Psychoanalytic Dimensions courses are free to the public. Non MIP members must pay $15 per credit if they wish to receive CEs. Each course awards one credit for each hour of instruction. Some of our longer courses may charge a flat fee for credits that is less than $15 per credit. Click on the course details for more information about continuing education credits.
Please note: Per APA requirements, psychologists must attend 100% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
Please note: Per NASW requirements, social workers must attend 80% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
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NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY
MIP has a strong and consistent commitment to equal opportunity and does not discriminate in any of its policies on the basis of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identification, nationality, race, religion, and sexual orientation.
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GRIEVANCE POLICY

The Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis (MIP) is fully committed to conducting all activities in strict conformance with the ethical principles and guidelines of the American Medical Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Association of Social Workers. MIP will comply with all legal and ethical responsibilities to be non-discriminatory in promotional activities, program content and in the treatment of program participants. The monitoring and assessment of compliance with these standards will be the responsibility of the appropriate MIP Committee Co-Chairs in consultation with the members of the appropriate MIP Committee, and other members or officers of the Board of Directors as is necessary.

 

The individual filing the grievance will be asked to submit their comments in written format to the Institute Administrator

Contact name: Liz Martin

Email: reachmip@gmail.com

Telephone number: 617-469-2777

Address: 70 Florence Street, Boston, MA 02131

The appropriate Committee Co-Chairs will review the grievance and will respond to the aggrieved within ninety days of receiving the written grievance.

If the grievance concerns a speaker, the content presented by the speaker, or the style of presentation, the Chair will then pass on the comments to the speaker, assuring the confidentiality of the grieved individual. If the grievance concerns course or program content, level of presentation, or the facilities in which the activity was offered, the appropriate chair will mediate and will be the final arbitrator.

The confidentiality of the aggrieved will be monitored and maintained in these consultations.

Updated July 30, 2019

reachmip@gmail.com
(617) 469-2777

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